needsmorelove

[about] All it needs is more love. And who knows what might happen to you then?   

All it needs is more love. And who knows what might happen to you then?

stunningpicture:

Long Exposure of an Airliner Lifting Off

stunningpicture:

Long Exposure of an Airliner Lifting Off

(via somethingwickedthiswaycome)

— 16 hours ago with 54831 notes

ruinedchildhood:

when you finally get your period

Hahah

(Source: allgrownupandsavingchina, via langleav)

— 1 day ago with 11159 notes

huffingtonpost:

We all love our pets, but for every indifferent cat and laid-back dog, there are animals who can only be described as stage-5 clingers. For all 17 of these adorable pet’s that love their owners too much go here. 

— 1 day ago with 988 notes
"Let people who do not know what to do with themselves in this life, but fritter away their time reading magazines and watching television, hope for eternal life…..The life I want is a life I could not endure in eternity. It is a life of love and intensity, suffering and creation, that makes life worth while and death welcome. There is no other life I should prefer. Neither should I like not to die."
Walter Kaufmann (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

— 2 days ago with 389 notes

feelingfairyish:

lotsofdisney:

Cinderella Pencil Test

When I first saw this, I actually teared up a little. The notes on the frames make it so much more amazing. That is true art. 

(via langleav)

— 2 days ago with 36027 notes
"Curiosity is the lust of the mind."
Thomas Hobbes (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

— 3 days ago with 1222 notes

chase-me-charlie:

fightingforanimals:

These are some of them, most were golden retrivers and labradors, but also included german shepherds and other breeds. Sadly most are dead now, while many people forget them and don’t spare them a thought. 

As people lay dying, trapped and hurt, a team of nearly 100 loyal and courageous search dogs put their lives on the line to help humans. Without them, many more would not have survived, yet few people consider them. 

In such a chaotic, terrifying, hot, acrid-smelling, smokey and loud environment, countless human lives depended on their ability to focus, listen, respond to their handlers, and work tirelessly. Stepping over cracked glass, hot tarmac, through flames and thick smoke, being winched over deep ravines, they battled on to seek out survivors and bring them aid. 

They worked around the clock, day and night, searching, sniffing, over and over. Not only did they search, but they comforted - many eyewitnesses speak of how the dogs would stop and sit by newly-recovered victims, giving them a sense of hope and relief, before moving on to look for the next. As the situation became desperate, and the rescue workers and fire teams became utterly distraught at the amount of people who were recovered dead, these dogs brought them comfort, sitting with them on breaks, letting them grieve.

Many of these dogs are old, and have passed away. Let us remember the courage and loyalty they showed at such a horrendous event. They didn’t have a choice, but nonetheless they did what was asked of them and helped save countless lives. Don’t let their bravery be forgotten today either, or their determination to be a ‘good dog’ despite the scary and dangerous environment around them.

And let’s not forget that these dogs actually became depressed when they kept finding dead bodies; they thought they were failing to save people. The workers helping had to hide in the ruble just to let the dogs find a living person and lift their spirits.

(via somethingwickedthiswaycome)

— 3 days ago with 69161 notes
"

I’ve lost count of how many years I’ve sat in this nook, looking from the window down onto the world below. The movements of the people that come and go are the same, day after day, year after year, just different faces.

There was a little girl, though, with caramel coloured curls. Every day she wore the same red coat, and a matching ribbon in her hair. She would skip along beside her mother on her way to school, down there, along the pavement past the café on the corner, past the bakery, the butcher’s shop and then across the street into the plaza on the other side.

Do you remember? We watched her together and wondered what she would do, and who she would be when she was grown. If she would still sing as she skipped along that same path, not a care in the world.

And she does. She does still skip along the pavement, past the same store fronts, most of which haven’t changed after all of these years. The ribbon in her hair is gone and the hand that she holds is no longer her mother’s, but that belonging to a lover, a friend. The movements are the same, day after day, just different faces.

It’s just me up here now and I have often wondered if you still care about such things. If you’ve ever thought of that girl and who she has become now that she is grown.

I see another little girl now. She skips along the pavement past the café on the corner, the bakery, the butcher’s shop and then across the street into the plaza on the other side. And look at her! She wears a little red coat with a matching ribbon in her hair. The hand that reaches to her to hurry her along as she skips and sings, it’s yours …

And I catch a glimpse of my reflection in the glass as I watch you both come and go. The movements are the same, both down there and up here in my window. Just different faces.

"
— 3 days ago with 352 notes
thepeopleofsingapore:

"My family moved here from China when I was 7. I don’t tell many people that. I’ve lived here for 20 years and am a citizen. I’ve been through the school system, I work in the government, my accent and mannerisms are local… and I’ve never considered myself anything but Singaporean. 

But I’m always afraid that someone will say I’m not Singaporean enough. I wonder: ‘What is enough?’ Is it enough to go to school here? Do you have to be born here? Do your parents have to be born here? It has made me afraid to embrace my Chinese heritage. But as I get older, I’m starting to feel I need to explore that aspect of my identity and learn to accept it as part of myself.”

Sometimes

thepeopleofsingapore:

"My family moved here from China when I was 7. I don’t tell many people that. I’ve lived here for 20 years and am a citizen. I’ve been through the school system, I work in the government, my accent and mannerisms are local… and I’ve never considered myself anything but Singaporean.

But I’m always afraid that someone will say I’m not Singaporean enough. I wonder: ‘What is enough?’ Is it enough to go to school here? Do you have to be born here? Do your parents have to be born here? It has made me afraid to embrace my Chinese heritage. But as I get older, I’m starting to feel I need to explore that aspect of my identity and learn to accept it as part of myself.”

Sometimes

— 3 days ago with 81 notes

fiona-tang:

Art Attack was such an experience! We were given a plain canvas and had to start and finish a painting in 4 hours!! The paintings are then auctioned off and a portion of it goes towards scholarship for Emily Carr University. Super fun and super meaningful!

"Second Coming" (24" x 36", September 2014) - SOLD

— 4 days ago with 240 notes
"I used to walk into a room full of people and wonder if they liked me… now I look around and wonder if I like them."
— 1 week ago with 44801 notes