needsmorelove

[about] All it needs is more love. And who knows what might happen to you then?   

All it needs is more love. And who knows what might happen to you then?

"Please don’t expect me to always be good and kind and loving. There are times when I will be cold and thoughtless and hard to understand."
Sylvia Plath (via larmoyante)

(via infjadvice)

— 4 days ago with 11202 notes
thepeopleofsingapore:

"She was sad the other day because kids at her preschool teased her that she doesn’t have a real mommy or daddy. Narrow ideas of family can be hurtful towards adoptive families like ours. We hope that changes."

thepeopleofsingapore:

"She was sad the other day because kids at her preschool teased her that she doesn’t have a real mommy or daddy. Narrow ideas of family can be hurtful towards adoptive families like ours. We hope that changes."

— 4 days ago with 105 notes
mapsontheweb:

Largest company in each European country


Sweden- Volvo
Norway - Satoil
Finland - Nokia
Denmark - Maersk
Germany - Volkswagen
Netherlands - Shell (Dutch/British company)
UK - BP
France - Total
Portugal - EDP
Spain - Santander
Belgium - InBev
Belarus - Belaz
Russia - Gazprom
Turkey - Koc
Greece - National Bank of Greeve
Austria - OMV
Switzerland - Glencore
Czech Republic - Skoda
Estonia - Eesti Energia
Latvia - Elko
Lithuania - Maxima
Poland - Orlen
Italy - Eni
Hungary - Mol
Luxembourg - ArcelorMittal
Croatia - INA
Romania - Petrom
Bosnia - Elektroprivreda
Slovenia - Petrol
Bulgaria - NEK EAD
Serbia - Naftna Industrija Srbije
Albania - Taçi Oil

mapsontheweb:

Largest company in each European country

  • Sweden- Volvo
  • Norway - Satoil
  • Finland - Nokia
  • Denmark - Maersk
  • Germany - Volkswagen
  • Netherlands - Shell (Dutch/British company)
  • UK - BP
  • France - Total
  • Portugal - EDP
  • Spain - Santander
  • Belgium - InBev
  • Belarus - Belaz
  • Russia - Gazprom
  • Turkey - Koc
  • Greece - National Bank of Greeve
  • Austria - OMV
  • Switzerland - Glencore
  • Czech Republic - Skoda
  • Estonia - Eesti Energia
  • Latvia - Elko
  • Lithuania - Maxima
  • Poland - Orlen
  • Italy - Eni
  • Hungary - Mol
  • Luxembourg - ArcelorMittal
  • Croatia - INA
  • Romania - Petrom
  • Bosnia - Elektroprivreda
  • Slovenia - Petrol
  • Bulgaria - NEK EAD
  • Serbia - Naftna Industrija Srbije
  • Albania - Taçi Oil

(Source: reddit.com)

— 5 days ago with 411 notes
"La vita non è né brutta né bella, ma è originale!"

Italo Svevo, La coscienza di Zeno 

  • Translation:Life is neither ugly nor beautiful, but it is original!
(via wordsnquotes)
— 6 days ago with 227 notes
globalvoices:


this is against promoting learning, one of NLB’s mission. Are gays not part of a family, not someone’s child, brother, friend?

Singapore’s National Library’s has banned three children’s books that feature same-sex couples after one person’s complaint, calling the decision ‘pro-family’. The reading public is not happy.
Singapore’s Libraries Don’t Want Kids Reading About Tango the Penguin and His Two Loving Fathers

globalvoices:

this is against promoting learning, one of NLB’s mission. Are gays not part of a family, not someone’s child, brother, friend?

Singapore’s National Library’s has banned three children’s books that feature same-sex couples after one person’s complaint, calling the decision ‘pro-family’. The reading public is not happy.

Singapore’s Libraries Don’t Want Kids Reading About Tango the Penguin and His Two Loving Fathers

— 6 days ago with 36 notes
"I think the only way to get through this life is laughing hard and constantly, mostly at myself."
Shannon Hale (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

— 6 days ago with 1380 notes
dpicchiophotos:

I had my boyfriend who smokes use matches for a few days instead of a lighter and record the date and time and whatever he was thinking about while smoking. 
It’s funny that he quit smoking a few weeks after this project. 

dpicchiophotos:

I had my boyfriend who smokes use matches for a few days instead of a lighter and record the date and time and whatever he was thinking about while smoking. 

It’s funny that he quit smoking a few weeks after this project. 

(via onceuponasam)

— 6 days ago with 157108 notes
"One of the reasons why we crave love, and seek it so desperately, is that love is the only cure for loneliness, and shame, and sorrow. But some feelings sink so deep into the heart that only loneliness can help you find them again. Some truths about yourself are so painful that only shame can help you live with them. And some things are just so sad that only your soul can do the crying for you."
Gregory David Roberts, Shantaram (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

— 6 days ago with 936 notes

huffingtonpost:

DEBI JACKSON, MOTHER OF TRANSGENDER CHILD, GIVES MOVING SPEECH

The best part of the video may be when Jackson addresses the comments she’s heard about her daughter and sets the record straight about statements like you “wanted a girl so you turned your child into one” and “kids have no idea what they want or who they are — my kids wants to be a dog, should I let him?”

So watch the full video to see her answers to those difficult questions here.

— 6 days ago with 21211 notes

impuretale:

ring-around-saturn:

katelinnea:

nedian:

I love when cats decide they love something.

That is a very patient bunny.

omg the kitty’s toes!!!

"I love you, strange floppy cat." 

(Source: faunasworld-moved, via onceuponasam)

— 6 days ago with 408526 notes

fiona-tang:

Figure drawings - July 14th 2014.

Please follow fiona-tang.tumblr.com for more of her art!

For those who are following me already: sincerely thank you for your kind support!

— 6 days ago with 86 notes

ryanpanos:

Radisson Blu Iveria: A Luxury Hotel That Became a Refugee Camp | Via

The Radisson Blu Iveria Hotel is located at the center of Georgia’s capital city Tbilisi. Built in 1967, it was Georgia’s finest hotel and a popular place to stay for its excellent location and sweeping views of the city. Then in the early 1990s, soon after the collapse and subsequent breakup of the USSR, civil war broke out in Georgia. Tbilisi was flooded with refugee ethnic Georgians coming in from the disputed territory of Abkhazia on the west of Georgia. More than 200,000 refugees poured into the city and the government was faced to deal with their reallocation. Many buildings in Tbilisi, including Hotel Iveria, were reallocated for housing the displaced. A thousand of them wound up in the hotel’s 22 floors where they would remain for the next ten years.

The hotel had been lying vacant at that time, unable to do business after the collapse of the Soviet Union and associated collapse of Georgia’s tourism industry. The monumental Soviet building that dominates the Georgian capital’s skyline became a pitiful sight, with broken windows patched up with cellophane, broken railings, crude plywood constructions on the balconies and a gaudy miscellany of washing hung everywhere.

— 6 days ago with 524 notes
Laos Warns Facebook Users Who Disrupt ‘Social Order, Undermine Security' →

Authorities in Laos have warned Facebook users that their accounts would be blocked if they posted information that “disrupt social order and undermine security.” 

The warning was made at the National Assembly, the country’s rubber stamp parliament, last week amid reports that the one party Communist government is drafting at least three new laws to regulate online information.

Lao Minister of Post and Telecommunications, Hiem Phommachanh, told parliament on Thursday that “technical officials” were taking steps to “block false information and some accounts that target to tarnish the reputation of individuals, disrupt social order, and tarnish the image of the country and the government,” according to state-run Vientiane Times.

Officials have said that some Facebook users had signed up without using their real names, making it difficult to trace their true identities, the paper said.

The officials also alleged that some users were found to be circulating “false information” to “disrupt social order and undermine security.”

Draft regulations

The Vientiane Times had said last month that the authorities are drafting regulations to streamline the use of social media.

The paper cited proposed regulations such as “Cybercrime Law,” “Information and Technology Law” and a “Prime Ministerial Decree.”

No details of the regulations were provided.

The draft regulations are expected to be completed this year, the newspaper quoted Keovisouk Solaphom, acting director-general of the Lao National Internet Centre, as saying.

Minister Hiem however assured lawmakers that Laos would not block Facebook as a whole, saying that social media was “useful” as a communication channel.

The Lao Communist Party leadership, which has ruled the country with an iron fist since 1975, has long enforced strict controls on broadcast and print media in the country, where only about 8 percent of the population has access to the Internet. 

Large jump

However, social media use has become increasingly prominent in Laos in recent years, especially among the younger population.

There has been a large jump in the number of Facebook users, from 200,000 users in 2012 to 530,000 as of May this year, 82 percent of whom are under 30 years old, according to Keovisouk.

Last month, Vientiane Times cited rumors circulated on Facebook of foreign traffickers of human organs operating in a southeast province, causing “panic” among local residents.

Beyond that, “bad elements” have used social media to “tarnish” the ruling Lao People’s Revolutionary Party and government policies, the paper added. 

It was also alleged that Lao social media posted unfounded reports on a Lao Airlines plane crash last year.

In the nation’s worst known air disaster, the plane plunged into the Mekong River killing all 49 people on board.

Social media users had posted photos of the wrong plane, and one man had had to announce on Facebook that he was not dead after users speculated he had been on the flight, a report said

Reported by RFA’s Lao Service. Written in English by Di Hoa Le. 

Copyright © 1998-2014, RFA. Used with the permission of Radio Free Asia, 2025 M St. NW, Suite 300, Washington DC 20036.RFA Content may not be used with any advertising materials. 

(Source: southeastasianists)

— 1 week ago with 7 notes
Women leading effort to clear unexploded bombs in Laos →
By Sally Sara, Foreign Correspondent

Women are on the frontline of the effort to find and destroy millions of unexploded cluster bombs which are still claiming lives decades after being dropped on Laos.

The US dropped up to 260 million cluster bombs on Laos during the Vietnam War - the equivalent of one bombing mission every eight minutes, for nine years.

It left Laos as the most heavily bombed country, per capita, in the world.

Up to 30 per cent of the munitions failed to explode on impact, leaving thousands of hectares of land contaminated with bombs that can explode at any time. Decades later, people who were not even born when the war ended are being killed by the bombs.

Now, peace activists are urging the US to provide more money to pay for the bomb clearance effort.

Women make up 40 per cent of the clearance teams operated by the Mines Advisory Group (MAG) in Xieng Khouang province, which borders Vietnam.

The cluster bomblets, nicknamed “bombies” by the locals, are only the size of a tennis ball, but they are deadly.

After four decades of rain and dust, they are very difficult to see in the soil.

Phou Vong, 46, is a member of one of the MAG female de-mining teams. She will never forget the first time she found a cluster bomblet.

“I was excited as well as frightened. I hesitated a bit but I thought I should be glad to see it, because in a sense I was helping my people,” Ms Vong said.

Ms Vong and her colleagues say more international help is needed to clear the estimated 80 million unexploded cluster bombs in Laos.

“If we want to clear these bombs, I would like them to continue to support more than what they have been [doing] so far. This is not enough because there are really a lot of bombs,” she said.

The executive director of Lao peace advocacy group Legacies of War, Channapha Khamvongsa, says the US bombing campaign caused widespread destruction in Laos, and is still claiming lives.

“Forty years later, people are still being killed and maimed,” she said.

“Children that were born two generations after the war are still being harmed. This is a continuing tragedy.”

The US has increased its annual funding for bomb clearance and victim assistance to $12 million, but Ms Khamvongsa says more help is needed.

“Since the mid ’90s, the US has been providing - up until recently - on average around $2 million per year, which is really not a lot of money considering the scale of the problem,” she said.

“We are providing people an opportunity to do the right thing.

“And when there is so much wrong in the world today, who doesn’t want to do the right thing and do something that is solvable, something that we can work towards addressing and we can eventually solve? This is so solvable.”

It is estimated more than 20,000 people have been killed or injured by cluster bombs since the war ended.

Farmer Tier Keomanyseng, 33, lost both his hands and eyes when a cluster bomb exploded while he was working in the fields in 2012. He was knocked unconscious by the force of the blast.

“I knew nothing. I didn’t remember anything at all. I didn’t feel anything,” he said.

Mr Keomanyseng is now profoundly disabled and unable to provide for his family.

In the weeks after the accident, he wanted to end his life. Now, he is trying to accept his new life.

“I feel that I have more hope now. My heart says I want to help my wife but, I just can’t do it. I am still concerned about my wife and my children,” he said.

It is unclear how long it will take to find and destroy all of the unexploded ordnance in Laos.

Ms Khamvongsa says the people of Laos are determined to clear the millions of bombies and rebuild their country.

“What’s really remarkable about the people of Laos, and what gives me so much hope, is their own sense of optimism, and endurance and spirit,” she said.

“And perseverance to be able to survive such devastating history and past and to overcome it with such an amazing sense of spirit, of good-hearted spirit.”

(Source: southeastasianists)

— 1 week ago with 27 notes
"The biggest deception of the past thousand years is this: to confuse poverty with stupidity."
Orhan Pamuk (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

— 1 week ago with 1224 notes